Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 37th Asia-Pacific Nursing and Medicare Summit Osaka, Japan.

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Day 1 :

Asia Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rose E. Constantino photo
Biography:

Rose E Constantino is an Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Department of Health and Community Systems and teaches Forensic Nursing. She is the Senior Editor of “Forensic Nursing: Evidence-based Principles and Practice” published by F. A. Davis in 2013. Her pro bono family law practice is founded on her research on the consequences of intimate partner violence on the health, safety and well-being of women, men and children worldwide. Her current research is in comparing the effectiveness of online and face-to-face intervention in women and children in intimate partner violence. She is mentoring students in developing the HELPP Zone app as a training tool for bystanders worldwide in recognizing, responding and preventing relationship violence including domestic and sexual violence.

Abstract:

Objectives: To compare face-to-face, email, text messaging, and wearable accessory as feasible and effective methods of delivering prevention and intervention strategies to survivors of women in intimate partner violence (IPV) and 2) Explore mobile and wearable devices to advance health and nursing.

Methods: A sequential transformative mixed methods design including quantitative and qualitative data collection and data analysis was used. The HELP (Health, Education on safety, and Legal rights and Privileges) intervention was delivered to three study groups, Face-to-Face (FTF), Email (EML) and Waitlist Controls (WLC) in six modules once every week for 6 weeks. The 32 adult female participants who experienced IPV were 45.2% Asian, 32.3% White, and 22.5% Black. Outcome measures were PROMIS anger, anxiety, and depression scales.

Results: Differences in PROMIS anger, anxiety, and depression scales were found between EML and WLC, and EML and FTF. The anger, anxiety and depression mean scores pretest to posttest difference was significant for EML (p < 0.001); FTF (p = 0.01) and WLC (p = 0.01). In a descriptive study on Text Messaging Intervention (TMI) to twenty (n = 20) 18-24 year-old women (n = 10) and men (n = 10), results also showed significant pre to post test increases in knowledge of major health consequences of IPV (p < 0.001) and confidence in responding and intervening in IPV situation (p<0.001).

Implications: Any delivery method could be useful in delivering intervention to women in IPV because in the WLC group, participants displayed significant increased levels of anger, anxiety and depression post intervention while the FTF showed several absences and incomplete responses to HELP. We are exploring a WATCH4HELP wearable App that will serve as a symptom management tool for women in IPV. WATCH4HELP users will input information on their current thought/ mood/behavior into the user interface via buttons, gestures and voice commands enabling them to connect to a pre-selected information system and/or healthcare provider during specific situations, facilitating coping skills while enhancing perceived social support. It is important for women in IPV to have a WATCH (Wearable Accessory To Call for HELP) that can be used without fumbling for a phone or other non-wearable device that is not discreetly reachable in times of great disturbance.

Conclusions: Further research could be conducted to determine whether email alone or email plus mobile, text messaging and/or wearable devices are best evidence in delivering interventions using these three and other PROMIS measures.

Asia Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yoshiko Hasebe photo
Biography:

Yoshiko HASEBE has been working at Nayoro City University School of Health Science. She is a professor of Adult Nursing, and has her expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the nursing practice. She has published many textbooks and DVDs about nursing arts in Japan.

 

Abstract:

Many cancer patients on outpatient chemotherapy complain of dysgeusia. Thus, we searched the literature database of four journals that publish articles related to anti-cancer chemotherapy and taste perception, and reviewed knowledge useful for nursing care of cancer patients.

We found that dysgeusia frequently occurred at a relatively early stage when FOLFOX/FOLFIRI combined with 5-FU, or regimens involving a taxane and related agents were used. The risk of dysgeusia was significantly higher with DTX than with other regimens. This can be explained by the formation of a chelate between 5-FU and zinc, which in turn elevates urinary excretion of zinc, leading to zinc deficiency.

Perception of all basic tastes (saltiness, sweetness, sourness, and umami), except bitterness, tended to be impaired. The frequency of impairment of saltiness perception appeared to be relatively high. Taxanes and related regimens were associated with a high occurrence rate of impairment of umami perception and with severe changes in saltiness perception. Considering the report showing the link between the impairment of saltiness perception and low plasma zinc levels, regimens involving 5-FU is likely to cause disorders in saltiness perception.

Possible causes of dysgeusia attributed to anti-cancer agents include inhibition of taste bud metabolism, lingual nerve disorder and zinc deficiency. It is likely that dysgeusia in patients receiving a taxane and related agents is attributed to peripheral nerve disorders, since these agents do not cause zinc deficiency. Experimental S-1 administration in rats suggested the possibility that dysgeusia is caused by damage to the gustatory nerve but not mucosal epithelia and taste buds.

Regimens involving relatively low doses of 5-FU, for example CMF and FEC therapies, can cause dysgeusia, although it did not appear severe enough to influence patients’ appetite. The frequency of dysgeusia in patients receiving gemcitabine (GEM) was also significantly low.

Asia Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shaher H Hamaideh photo
Biography:

Shaher Hamaideh has completed his PhD in 2004 from University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. He is the Associate dean at Faculty of Nursing at the Hashemite University, Jordan. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member in international nursing journal of repute

Abstract:

Background and purpose: Patients with schizophrenia suffer from loneliness, inadequate social support, and low levels of satisfaction with life, which make them more vulnerable to relapse and exacerbate of their symptoms. There is a gap in research studies that examine the predictors and relations of loneliness with social support and satisfaction with life. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying the predictors and relationships of loneliness with social support and satisfaction with life. Methods: Data were collected from 230 patients with schizophrenia through a structured interview using Loneliness Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Satisfaction with Life Scale, and demographics.

Results: The mean score of loneliness was 52.6 (SD=7.5). Two-thirds of the participants had moderate to high level of loneliness. The mean score of perceived social support was 44.86 (SD=16.84). The highest level of social was from significant others. The mean score for satisfaction with life was 17.12 (SD=7.73). Significant correlations were found between loneliness and perceived social support, satisfaction with life, age at diagnosis, duration of disorder, and duration of treatment. Two factors (satisfaction with life, social support from friends, and duration of treatment) predicted loneliness explaining 41.3 % of the total variance. 

Conclusions:

Psychiatric nurses caring for patients with schizophrenia should incorporate new treatment strategies that aimed at decreasing levels of loneliness and enhancing social support and satisfaction with life among their patients.

  • Cardiac Nursing | Clinical Nursing | Critical care Nursing | Nursing Education | Adult Health Nursing | Women Health Nursing | Legal Nursing | Pediatric Nursing | Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

Session Introduction

Beth Ann Swan

Thomas Jefferson University, USA

Title: Creating a New Education Paradigm to Prepare Nurses for the 21st Century
Speaker
Biography:

Beth Ann Swan is Professor and former Dean at the Jefferson College of Nursing.  Dr. Swan is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, past president of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing, and a 2007-2010 Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow. Dr. Swan has a distinguished record of extramural funding, publications, and presentations nationally and internationally on topics related to ambulatory care, care coordination and transition management, and technology applications for education and practice. She is Co-Editor of the text, Care Coordination and Transition Management Core Curriculum.  Dr. Swan received her PhD and MSN from the University of Pennsylvania, and BSN from Holy Family University.

Abstract:

Nurse educators are accountable to keep baccalaureate education responsive to the ever changing healthcare delivery environment.  The changing context of healthcare delivery requires focusing on population health and social determinants, providing interprofessional, team-based care, advancing innovation, and preparing practice ready baccalaureate nursing graduates.  To be practice ready, nursing graduates must be agile and think and reason on their feet due to increasing care complexity beyond the hospital walls, changing care needs of individuals and families, advancing technology, shifting settings of care delivery, and managing multiple transitions. The purpose of this paper is to consider these healthcare changes and share a new, innovative baccalaureate nursing curriculum that radically shifts the paradigm from caring for patients to caring for people, and transforms from a diseased-based, acute care focused curriculum to one promoting a culture of health and multiple new and emerging roles of registered nurses.

Filipe Carvalho

The Royal Marsden Hospital, United Kingdom

Title: Advanced Nursing Practice in Colorectal Surgery
Speaker
Biography:

Filipe Carvalho is an Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Colorectal Surgery and also the Lead Nurse for Gastrostomies devices, in a specialist cancer treatment hospital in London. He has a Graduate Diploma in Cancer Care and he is enrolled on the final year of a Healthcare Practice MSc. Over the last year he contributed in the development of policies and protocols which have improved the quality of the service and worked alongside the clinical education team in training nursing staff across the Trust, ensuring constant provision of effective, high quality care that is compliant with National/Trust standards.

Abstract:

The professional growth and future of nursing is directly associated with advanced nursing practice (ANP), this is due to the variety of roles that it comprehends in which a nurse is perceived to practice at a complex level. Expanding the skills and knowledge of nurses allows handling proficiently with the surge of chronic illnesses, reduce costs, help with staff shortages, and decrease waiting times. Although if inadequately engaged, can cost money instead of saving, and build up patient expectations. Hence, the constant progress as well as evaluation of ANP is of extraordinary significance to nursing and to the public.

As an Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Colorectal Surgery I integrated into an already established surgical team to carry out their extended roles which include: routine ward management of the surgical patient, including practical procedures and the admission and clerking of surgical patients, with potential theatre time and activity depending on the service needs, as well as monitoring and troubleshooting when complications arise. I act as a highly specialised role model and leader for all members of staff, and play a major role in the continuous development of the services within the Trust and as a potential member of a range of trust quality/process improvement project groups.

My presentation will discuss my role and duties and the positive impact that it had on a well-established team and service.

Speaker
Biography:

Sheri Howard received her Ph.D. from William Carey University and has more than 15 years of simulation experience. She is the director of Simulation at the University of Memphis, a premier University in the United States. She has built and designed multiple simulation labs and has taught classes on simulation all over the United States as well as participated in international research projects utilizing simulation. 

Abstract:

Nursing programs throughout the United States are struggling to meet the increasing dynamic healthcare demand to produce competent graduate nurses while overcoming the paucity of nursing faculty, the amplified sum of students in clinical groups and the abating obtainability of clinical site placements.  Requests from stakeholders to produce practice-ready graduate nurses have resulted in an amplified use of simulation.  In turn, nursing programs have grown to capacity and clinical resources are stretched to the maximum. Large group simulations are more challenging for nurse educators to conduct while maintaining the interest of all participants.  Traditional methods of observer role assignments may not allow for full immersion of observers in the simulation experience, and observers may not feel valued as a team member, which could decrease confidence and satisfaction.  Research has revealed that students learn as much while participating in an observer role during simulation as do the students who are in an active participation role during simulation, however, students may not feel valued as a team member in the observer role, which could decrease confidence and satisfaction.  Utilizing Defined observer roles offers a solution to this issue.  Defined observer roles will allow students the opportunity to think through situations by actively participating in the simulation experience without the pressure of “being the nurse” in a simulation.  Students can put into practice new concepts without fear of harming a patient.  An increase in critical thinking skills will also better prepare students for practice. This presentation will focus on those defined observer roles.

Speaker
Biography:

Bed Anand Nathoo is  a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of health, pre-qualifying Nursing Department at Bucks New University with a Master Degree and the NMC level one registration.  I teach mainly acute care at both pre-and post-qualifying levels. I have a host of work as well as life experiences.  I can speak five languages.  Having spent the last 6 years completing a ‘Professional Doctorate in Nursing, I have finished my Viva in January 2017 with minor amendments.

Abstract:

Background: Older people are amongst those in most need of compassionate care. Compassion, which can be demonstrated in 5 levels (compassion-, compassion, compassion+, compassion++ and compassion+++) is defined as the ability to appreciate and empathise with an appropriate action to ease suffering. Earlier research studies have explored patients’ and/or qualified nurses’ perspectives of compassion in nursing. This study is the first to explore compassion from the nurse educators’ (NEs), clinical mentors’ (CMs) and pre-qualifying nursing students’ (PQNSs) varying perspectives.

Aim:  To explore, discuss and evaluate views of compassion in the care of older people amongst nurse educators, pre-qualifying nursing students and clinical mentors.

Methods: A generic qualitative research approach was adopted using purposive sampling to recruit 39 participants (NEs=8, CMs=8 and PQNs=23). Semi-structured interviews yielded data that were analysed using framework analysis. Data collection was completed between July 2013 and February 2014.

Findings: Seven themes emerged: role modelling, working practices, care philosophy, clinical leadership, staff attitudes, quality care and nature and nurture. Role modelling was the dominant theme.

Discussion: This study adds to the literature by exploring multiple perspectives.  Whilst pre-qualifying nursing students and clinical mentors favoured compassion from the perspective of humanistic role models, nurse educators valued compassion as a means to demonstrate work practices, including competence. 

Whilst enhancing quality care, compassion can speed up patients’ recovery.

Conclusion:  From the accounts of these stakeholders, it is argued that compassionate care should be incorporated within practical sessions in the pre-qualifying curriculum and within care of the older person. In clinical practice, compassionate care should be embedded in its culture at all levels through clinical leadership.

Speaker
Biography:

Carmen WH Chan's palliative care research focuses on the promotion of advance care planning and advance directives, and targets on cancer patients, pediatric patients, older adults and the general public. Her research initiatives on this area have demonstrated excellence in design and innovation, and a great impact on the health care profession and the society. Professor Chan has just launched another large-scale population survey on the acceptance and completion of advance directive among the general public in Hong Kong.

 

Abstract:

The use of advance directives has been advocated in Western countries for over 20 years. In America, it is mandatory to ask admitted patients if they have advance directives under the Patient Self-Determination Act since 1991. In Hong Kong, little has been done about promoting advance directive in the health care context. Patients, family members and sometimes health care professionals still refrain from discussing dying and advance directives.

Aim: The aim of this knowledge transfer project was to promote public awareness and appreciation of the benefits of advance directive.

Methods: Phase one of the project included 8 road-shows to disseminate the philosophy and advertise the services available as regards to advance directive to 2800 citizens in the community in Hong Kong. Participants were given sets of the promotional materials (pamphlet and VCD) and completed a brief counselling and survey.  Phase two of the project involved a 2-day training workshop for 58 home care nurses and doctors on advance care planning and advance directives. The projects was evaluated by a pre-test post-test design in 108 clients under the care of these 58 health care professionals. Their understanding and active participation in a written advance director was increased. Family members reported improved scores in a family satisfaction scale and the hospital readmission rate was also improved. The study also stimulate public debate on a legislative form of advance directive in newspaper, forum, and hospital authority committee.

Conclusion: The project has increased the community’s awareness of, and interest in, the available right of advance directive when a person is facing a life-limiting disease and encourage more openness in preparing for a good death

Speaker
Biography:

Wai-Tong Chien is a professor in mental health nursing at School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University for six years and the Associate Head for Research and Scholarship since 2014. As an advanced mental health nursing practitioner and active researcher, Prof. CHIEN has strived to improve mental health in her native Hong Kong SAR, China in the past 25 years by establishing psychoeducation, motivational interviewing, mindfulness-based, mutual support group, and other psychosocial interventions to community-resided people with mental health problems and their family members, as well as through research, advocacy and mental health promotion. He has also served as editors and editorial board members of international refereed nursing/healthcare journals, as well as invited speakers of international conferences/seminars. He has obtained over 25 health research grants with >HKD14,000,000 (>US$2,000,000) and published over 130 articles in peer-reviewed international nursing/psychiatric/health care journals and substantial number of conference papers and book chapters

Abstract:

Psychoeducation and other psychosocial interventions in schizophrenia are evidenced to improve patients’ knowledge about the illness, mental state and relapse rate. Nevertheless, other benefits to patients such as their functioning and insight into illness, or to be substantive in a longer term (e.g., >12 months), are inconsistent and thus uncertain, especially in non-Western countries. This single-blind multi-site RCT was to test the effects of a mindfulness-based psycho-education group intervention (MBPG) for adult patients with early-stage schizophrenia spectrum disorders over an 18-month follow-up, in comparison to a conventional psycho-education group or treatment-as-usual only. The controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01667601) was conducted with repeated-measures, three-arm design at two psychiatric outpatient clinics in both mainland China and Hong Kong. A stratified random sample of 150 adult outpatients with schizophrenia (i.e., 75 from each country; from which, 25 assigned into each of three arms). After baseline measurement, patients were randomly assigned into a MBPG program, a conventional psychoeducation group, or treatment-as-usual only. Primary outcomes, including psychosocial functioning and re-hospitalization rate, and other patient outcomes were measured and compared between three study groups over the 18-month follow-up (at baseline and 1-week, 9-month and 18-month following intervention). One hundred and thirty-seven (91%) patients completed the three post-tests. Their mean age and duration of illness were about 24-25 years and 28-30 months (range 4-60 months), respectively; and 54-56% were male. Results of multivariate analyses of variance showed that the MBPG got significantly greater improved in psychosocial functioning (p=0.0009), average length of psychiatric hospitalizations (p=0.004), psychotic symptoms (p=0.002), and insight into illness/treatment (p=0.008) than the other two groups over the 18-month follow-up. Mindfulness-oriented psycho-education program for adults with schizophrenia is found to be an effective psychosocial intervention providing several long-term positive effects in patients’ mental health, re-hospitalizations, functioning, and acceptance of their illness/treatment.

Daniel Joseph E. Berdida

University of the Philippines, Philippines

Title: Langerhans Cell Hsitiocytosis in a Toddler
Speaker
Biography:

Daniel Joseph E. Berdida is practicing Pediatric Nurse at University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital. He held the position as Associate Dean of Universidad de Manila College of Health Sciences for four years. He is on his final year in completing his PhD at Philippine Normal University. He is constantly involved in various international and local professional research organizations in education and nursing practice

Abstract:

Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare nonmalignant disease of unknown etiopathogenesis characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells in one or many organs in the body such brain, lungs, skin, bone and soft tissues. LCH most commonly affects children within 1 to 4 years old. Prognosis depends on the number of organs involved, the level of affectation to the normal functions of the organ, and the rate of progression of the disease. Most of the children with LCH it resolves naturally and self-limiting. However, for patients with multisystem involvement, it is generally managed with steroids and chemotherapeutic agents. Even though LCH is not considered a malignancy, pediatric oncology nurse performs pivotal role in managing the complex care of these patients which are usually managed inpatient and outpatient oncology settings. This study offers nurses with insight related to pathophysiology and treatment modalities thereby preparing the nurse to provide informed, competent and quality nursing care to patients and families

Speaker
Biography:

Shaher Hamaideh has completed his PhD in 2004 from University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. He is the Associate dean at Faculty of Nursing at the Hashemite University, Jordan. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member in international nursing journal of repute

Abstract:

Background and purpose: Moral distress has received much attention in nursing literature. This study aimed to conduct and evaluate the effectiveness of a workshop on moral distress level among psychiatric nurses in Jordan.

Methods: The study was conducted in the two largest public psychiatric hospitals. All nurses in the selected hospitals were invited to participate in the study. The final sample consisted of 105 nurses who assigned randomly to either interventional or control group. A pretest-posttest control group design was employed. All participants in both groups completed Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric nurses (MDS-P) before the workshop, and 3 months after the workshop. The intervention group received the workshop while the control group did not. The workshop consisted of case studies and discussions of distressing situations in psychiatric hospitals; discussions of signs, symptoms, and causes of moral distress; and formulation of strategies to deal with moral distress. 

Results: Results showed significant differences in moral distress levels between pretest and posttest measures for the interventional group (t=5.05, p< 0.000) indicating that the workshop significantly reduced the level of moral distress among psychiatric nurses.

Conclusions: Further workshops to other psychiatric nurses in other settings as well as for control group nurses are required to be conducted.

Speaker
Biography:

Kifah Awadallah DNP, MSN, RN has been a Senior Nurse Educator since 2010.  She is currently the Senior Nurse Educator at the Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi for the Emergency Medicine Institute, Imaging Institute and Critical Care Transport.  She is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.  She was previously a Chemist and worked as a laboratory manager for the Center for AIDS Research at University Hospitals in Cleveland.  She is an active member in the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA).  She was nominated for her third term as the Education Committee Conference Planning with the ENA.

Abstract:

Introduction: This presentation highlights the need for a learning needs assessment for Registered Nurses prior to the planning of a specific and comprehensive curriculum.  In this method nurses are empowered to drive their own education and professional development. The presentation will elaborate on the technique used for stratifying specific skills and the development of a calendar for professional development.

Background: Building a start-up organization in the Middle East from a USA-based hospital franchise integrated caregivers from around the world with backgrounds of different scopes of practice and models of care.  Time constraints for reviewing skills presented complexity; however, the development of both general, advanced and individulised content was imperative.  Engagement of that staff was essential for sustainability of learning and retention of their valued clinical practice.  The learning needs assessment was a tool that was created for the caregivers to self-report learning needs.  As adult learns, this substantiates the need to know what is not known.

Results: This proposed method of creation and delivery of nursing curriculum was important in adapting learning for the audience.  This was a strategy to increase engagement and maximize the efficiency using restricted time available to present the most relevant content for the learner.  The learning needs assessment was the foundation for structuring the curriculum based on current caregivers, rather than assuming the needs based on what is typically taught. 

Conclusion: A learning needs assessment has a profound impact in the development and structure of a specific unit’s curriculum. 

Speaker
Biography:

Will be updated soon...

Abstract:

Background: The effect of second-hand smoking (SHS) on breast cancer etiology is controversial. Genetic variants of the enzyme N-Acetyl-transferase 2 (NAT2) which is involved in the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens, may modify the association between SHS and breast cancer. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between SHS and breast cancer risk by NAT2 variants in Arab women in Israel, a unique population with high exposure to SHS and low active smoking and alcohol consumption rates.

Methods – This is a population-based case-control study consisting of never-smoking Arab women aged 30-70 from Northern Israel: 137 prevalent (diagnosed in 2008-2013) breast cancer patients and 274 population- based controls. All participants were interviewed using a detailed questionnaire relating to past and current exposure to SHS and to socio-demographic, gynecological and obstetric characteristics. Each participant provided a buccal smear for NAT2 genotype analyses. Logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders and stratified by NAT2 variants were used to assess the association between SHS and breast cancer.

Results – SHS was associated with breast cancer risk with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.14 (95% confidence interval, CI 1.21-3.78). Higher exposure to SHS was associated with higher risk of breast cancer compared to never exposed women, those exposed to SHS during childhood, adolescence and currently had an OR of 3.60 (95% CI 1.85-7.21) while those exposed during adolescence and currently but not during childhood had an OR of 1.73 (95%CI 1.05-2.86). NAT2 variants did not modify these associations.

Conclusions - SHS exposure in Arab women that never smoked is associated with increased risk for breast cancer. NAT2 genetic variation does  not seem to play a role in the association. Additional studies are needed in order to support these findings.

Speaker
Biography:

Elmer Catangui is a Filipino who obtained his stroke nursing expertise from the United Kingdom. He worked as a clinical nurse specialist in stroke and TIA in the UK for 12 years at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.  He graduated his Master’s Degree in London South Bank University major in Nursing but with background of specialist neuroscience, acute management in stroke, thrombolysis nursing and stroke prevention. He has published numerous articles, abstracts and research in the British and international journal of nursing and practice. He is also a nurse prescriber in the UK. He has passion in the hyper-acute management of stroke including thrombolysis treatment for acute ischemic stroke, inter-professional stroke education and secondary stroke prevention.  He is currently working as a nurse specialist in stroke care at the King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) Riyadh. He led and organized in the development of Specialized Stroke Nursing Program, a nurse-driven education initiative and a Stroke Support Group which aims to increase awareness of stroke prevention among patients, families and carers. He is also an Editorial board member of Public Health Open Journal. In 2014, he has been nominated by the UK’s Health Service Journal as a Rising Star Awards category due to his valuable contribution to stroke using the concept of a nurse-led ward round. In 2017, he has been awarded as the KAMC’s Nurse Ambassador of the Year because of developing innovative service in stroke care and improving the stroke competence of nurses in the acute hospital setting

Abstract:

The incidence of stroke in the KSA is expected to be higher in the next decades.  The creation of the stroke model of KAMC-Riyadh, as a novel care approach of admitting patients directly to the High Dependency Unit (HSDU), is aimed to improve patient’s functional outcome following a stroke.  Prior to the launch, a Specialized Stroke Nursing Program (SSNP) using an inter-professional approach was developed and implemented in order to address the nurse’s learning needs in stroke care. The aim of the project is to recount the structuring of the SSNP and continuously sustaining it toward a collaborative team model (CTM) is utilized in order to design, implement and sustain a SSNP.  The CMT, consisting of nurse specialist, clinical resource nurses and stroke therapists, work cohesively and regularly meet in order to continuously improve the program components and restructuring the learning objectives focusing on patient safety and outcome.  The SSNP is up and running since August 2014 and is consistently   evaluated after each run.  All participants’ feedback from the course evaluation was collated and analyzed thematically. The findings of the course evaluation were discussed as a team and made some necessary adjustments if necessary.  The SSNP has attended by more than 1000 nurses from emergency, acute medical and stroke units. Six major themes have emerged using the evaluation feedback:  The SSNP as (1) a program focusing on patient safety, (2) an inter-professional program promoting a collaborative stroke care, (3), a sustainable program which is relevant not only to stroke patients but to all medical patients, (4) a starting point to improve stroke care (5) a well-structured program that tailored –made to nurses’ learning needs. The creation of the SSNP is a showcase of dedication, passion and commitment of the team in order to provide an inter-professional learning education among nurses.  The use of CTM promotes effective communication, coordinated and organized team work. Collaborative team has a direct impact to enhanced and comprehensive stroke care. It has a significant impact on the participant’s learning

Speaker
Biography:

Tomoko YAMAMOTO has completed her Master at the age of 39 years from Osaka Prefectural University and postdoctoral studies from Wasseda University Postgraduate. She is the associate professor of Saitama-gakuen University, faculty of human studies. He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute

Abstract:

This study examined the support for children with disabilities in play activities during the process of shifting from home-based care to daycare settings. 

As the results, the support related to child development, families, and communities promoted playing that took into account children’s age and the types and levels of disability, understanding of children as well as their disabilities in the process of playing, inclusion of children in the community, and the building of a relationship between children and the community. 

Also, the results identified the following: in order to protect children’s rights to play, it is important to not only promote their recovery and development through playing, but also respect the independence of children with diseases or disabilities; create a better life for children and ensure their social participation through playing that is supported by a spontaneous motivation aiming at playing for its own sake; and obtain further support from national and local governments.