Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 38th International Conference on Nursing & Healthcare New York, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Luigina Mortari

University of Verona, Italy

Keynote: The sense of care

Time : 10:00-10:40

Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Luigina Mortari photo
Biography:

Luigina Mortari is the Dean of the Department of Human Sciences of the University of Verona. She is a Full Professor in Epistemology of Qualitative Research. Her main research fields are epistemology and qualitative methods in educational research; epistemology and qualitative methods in nursing research, the evaluative research in educational contexts and the practice of caring in educational settings.

Abstract:

Care is today a widespread term, but its meaning is not clear. One evident fact is that caring is fundamental in life, given that, without care, life could not flourish. Therefore, it is essential to achieve a valid theory of good caring that illuminates its essence in the entity of a human being and how it is necessary to take care of human existence. Lack of a full and complete being that characterizes human life at the same time opens to the being, to further not predefined existential possibilities; to exist means to be called upon to embody these possibilities. Giving body to the potentiality of our being requires care; therefore, caring for life also means committing to achieve our potential for a fully human life, one that is worthy of being lived. To define the essential qualities of care in nursing, involves developing a discussion process capable of showing that care is not only an obligation that the subject has towards him/herself, but that there is a relational dimension of care, a dimension that is ontologically necessary, and since it is ontologically necessary to interpret cure in relational terms, caring for others has all the features of becoming an ideal of existence. In order to define this issue this presentation will present the line of a rigorous theoretical analysis recursively related to a rigorous empirical research. It will be achieved as a descriptive theory of caring based on well-pondered arguments and on the results of our investigation aimed.

Keynote Forum

Roberta Silva & Luigina Mortari

University of Verona, Italy

Keynote: A phenomenological research focused on head nurses skills

Time : 10:40-11:20c

Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Roberta Silva & Luigina Mortari photo
Biography:

Roberta Silva has received her PhD from the University of Verona (BA and MA at Milan University) and she had been engaged as Education Manager for Professional Pathways in the same University (Department of Human Science). She is currently a Research Assistant in Educational Research.

Luigina Mortari is Dean of the Department of Human Sciences of the University of Verona. She is Full Professor in Epistemology of Qualitative Research. Her main research fields are: epistemology and qualitative methods in educational research, epistemology and qualitative methods in nursing research, the evaluative research in educational contexts, the practice of caring in educational settings.

Abstract:

The debate about the essential skills for nursing skills is broad and their definition has changed considerably over the years. Anyway, in the last years, many scholars share the idea that a nurse must have four main group of skills: technical (or professional) skills, communication and interpersonal skills, decision-making skills and management and team working skills. By analogy, we can say that similar are the competencies that are needed by a Head Nurse, but few are the scholars that have specifically focused their attention on this professional profile. Starting from these considerations, our research wants to fill this gap asking to some Head Nurses, what are, according to their lived experiences, the key competences that they need to effectively act as Head Nurse? According to this aim, we choose to follow a qualitative approach, because it allows to build inductively “working theories” able to describe a lived experience and more specifically, we choose phenomenological method because it is particularly suitable to explore the meanings that a practitioner gives to his or her experience. The tool of collecting data that seems to be more coherent with our aim and our methodological framework is the narrative interview because its being open-ended allows the subjects able to lead the interview, revealing what is significant for them, putting directly in touch with their meaning. The research team worked on the collected material to identify relevant units and to label them to agree on a shared version of the labelling process.

  • Adult Health Nursing | Public Health | Midwifery | Nursing Types | Medicine | Surgical Nursing | Legal Nursing
Location: Tribeca 1
Speaker

Chair

Van Le,

University of California- Irvine Health, USA

Biography:

I am a faculty member at George Brown College and teach in a BSCN collaborative nursing program In Toronto, Canada. I currently teach in the classroom, simulation and clinical arena. Also, I have taught in Simulation in the hospital and education arena. In my graduate studies in nursing and my PHD studies in curriculum and pedagogy in nursing, I have focused on examining more deeply teaching and learning in nursing education. My area of expertise is in clinical nursing, ethics, teaching and learning.

Abstract:

Clinical practice is an essential component in undergraduate nursing programs and clinical nurse educators are primarily involved in teaching in the clinical arena. Clinical instruction is a pedagogical process, where the clinical instructor guides and instructs students in their learning about nursing in the clinical environment. The teaching practice of nurse educators is underrepresented in the literature in nursing education and the forms of knowledge that clinical instructors bring to their teaching practice is absent. A grounded theory methodology suggested by Charmaz in 2010, guided the study design. Exploratory, semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve clinical nurse educator participants teaching in undergraduate nursing programs in a large metropolitan city in Ontario, Canada. The purpose of this study was twofold; to theorize the pedagogical practices of clinical nurse educators and to uncover the challenges that participants encountered while teaching in the clinical arena. The results revealed five important findings. In this presentation, the author discusses two of the study results. They are - The forms of knowledge that participants brought to their teaching in the clinical arena and the ethical practices that underpins their teaching. Teaching in the clinical arena in nursing is complex and multilayered. The practice of clinical nurse educators and how they contribute to student learning will be discussed in this presentation.

Biography:

Fatma Yasemin Kutlu completed her Nursing degree at Istanbul University Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and her Master’s degree and PhD degree in Istanbul University Health Science Institute. She is an Associate Professor of Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing at Istanbul University Florence Nightingale Nursing Faculty. She has published more than 100 papers, chapters, abstracts/congress proceedings in national and international journal. She has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the Turkish Journal of Psychiatric Nursing. She was the President of the Turkish Psychiatric Nurses Association (2009-2013). Also, she is a Member of the Horatio (European Association for Psychiatric Nurses) Expert Panel (Education Working Group).

Abstract:

This study was conducted as a research design with randomized controlled pretest, posttest, and control group with repeated measurement aiming to determine the effect of motivational interviewing on treatment compliance and quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients. A total of 60 patients with hemodialysis (30 experimental and 30 controls) were included in the sample of the study. The data were collected between March 2016 and July 2016 by using the questionnaire form and End-stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire with Short Form 36. Also, Biological/Biochemical values were obtained from medical records. After pretest, motivational interviewing consisting of four sessions was implemented to experimental group. Pre- and post-intervention and 3-month follow-up were performed in the experimental and the control groups. After intervention, there were detected meaningful difference posttest (Z=-4,217, P<0,05) and 3-month follow-up (Z=-3,074, P<0,05), when the pretest, posttest and 3-month follow-up End-stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire scores of the patients in the experimental and control groups were compared. Short Form-36 subscales showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in the pretest, posttest and 3-month follow-up. However, there was a meaningful difference between the pretest-posttest and pretest-3-month follow-up averages of the experimental group. Of the biological/biochemical data; daily fluid intake and potassium values were meaningful different in post-test and 3 months follow-up in albumin values. As a result, the motivational interviewing method was found to be effective in improving adherence to treatment and quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients.

Biography:

Zafar Iqbal Channa has completed his MS Nursing and also done adavanced Diploma in Hospital Administartion & HRM and diploma in Educational Planning & Management. He is currently working as Deputy Chief Nursing Superintendent (Dy. CNS) at Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto Medical University (SZABMU/PIMS), Islamabad. He has national and international exposure of attending nursing conferences as a participant and presenter. He is eager to do his PhD in Nursing and work for the development of nursing profession in Pakistan. He has research publications in his credit.

Abstract:

Rapid scientific and technological discoveries have increased demands of specialized nursing care. Knowledge and skills can be restored by engaging nurses in a set amount of continuing nursing education (CNE) program activities. Literature suggested that degree or license is not the end point of education after basic nursing study. Apparently, basic nursing education for practice becomes obsolete within five to ten years of graduation. This obsolescence can lead to the poor performance of nurses in clinical practice. Therefore, study was designed to investigate and compare barriers to participation among hospital nurses of two provinces in Pakistan. Cross sectional descriptive study approach used to collect data through convenience sampling technique of three hundred (n=300) nurses. “Barriers to Participation Questionnaire” (BPQ) was used as research tool. Quantitatively, result interpretation was set as “the lower the mean score in each type of barrier, higher the barrier was measured due to reverse Likert scale rating. Generally, administrative barrier was found higher and most prevalent barrier, work-related barrier was more predictive and financial barriers as predicting barrier as compare to family and personal barrier. Data also revealed that Punjab nurses have greater administrative with mean score of 2.16±0.87 and work-related barriers with mean score of 2.43±0.81 than the nurses from Sindh province with mean score of 2.26±0.75 and 2.81±0.90. Regarding financial barrier, both provincial nurses have equal level barriers than the family and personal barriers among nurses of two provinces. To keep nurses connected with advanced knowledge in rapidly changing health care environment, more opportunities of non-formal CNE programs should be provided for all employed nurses in all provinces.

Biography:

Abstract:

Background & Aim: Health Care Providers (HCP) are at high risk exposed to blood borne infections such as Hepatitis B (HBV), C (HCV) and Immune Deficiency Viruses (HIV). A huge number of injections are being administered in private clinics in Pakistan; majority of clinics run by unqualified quacks in a rural area. The risk exposures to HCPs in these clinics differ from those working in tertiary care hospitals due to accessibility of resources, infection control management, workshops, awareness, and qualifications. Many studies have shown strong association between transmission of blood borne pathogens and needle stick injuries. To determine the frequency and factors leading with unsafe injection practices at four major cities of district Sanghar (Sindh).

Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in HCPs running private clinics at four major cities of District Sanghar, Sindh Pakistan. By using multi stage sampling technique 370 clinics proportionately selected through cluster sampling and stratified sampling. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to determine the percentage of unsafe injection practices among HCP.

Analysis: Categorical variables were calculated in frequency with percentage, and continuous scale variables with mean and standard deviation such as age and years of experience. 95% confidence interval with proportion was used to calculate at least one needle stick injury in the last one year.

Results: Out of 370 clinics, 368 HCPs were interviewed; 37.8% paramedics, 29.9% quacks, 22.6% MBBS, 4.9% DHMS and 1.4% Hakeem. Mean age (SD) of HCPs was 39 (8.92) years, and with mean (SD) experience of 14.7 (7.2) years. 55.71% were collecting used syringes in dustbin, 22.01% in sharp container and 22.28% using needle cutter. At least one needle stick injury (NSI) in last one year among HCPs at clinics in District Sanghar Sindh was 27.4%.

Conclusion: HCPs running private clinics are at higher risk in acquiring blood borne infection (BBIs) due to reused needle stick injuries, and poor hepatitis B vaccination program. There is an emergency need in launching protective measure for HCWs, and shield them from epidemic of blood borne infections (BBIs).

Nafeesa Nomi Samson

Pakistan Healthcare Trust Hospital, Pakistan

Title: Diabetes and it precaution, to have a healthy life
Biography:

Nafessa Nomi working as a RN (nurse), done my nursing from Holy Family Hospital, Pakistan and a computer diploma holder from a reputable organization in Pakistan, Faculty at Seventh day Hospital, Pakistan. And my research is on Diabetes, and also medical consultant to the entire diabetic walking patient, emphasizing on daily excise with their diet plan and medicine. As a part time working and practicing critical cases or Emergency case with regards to the diabetes and surgery if required. Working in a church camp program on every Sunday with concern to the health program and awareness to all age groups, sharing note on common diseases and sharing healthy practice and precautions.

Abstract:

Diabetes is defined as the body's inability to produce insulin. There are two major types of diabetes: insulin dependent, and non-insulin dependent. Non-insulin dependent is the most common in adults. Those who have a history of this disease in their family are most at risk. They feel that heredity and diet have a great deal to do with it. These people should take care of themselves and watch out for the warning signs such as excessive thirst, extreme hunger and irritability, and unexplained weight loss. Alternative approaches to the treatment of diabetes is a general term for a disease caused by defective carbohydrate metabolism and characterized by abnormally large amounts of sugar in the blood and urine. Diabetes is considered a group of disorders with multiple causes, rather than a single disorder. The human pancreas secretes a hormone called insulin that promotes the entry of sugar glucose into all tissues of the body, providing energy for bodily activities. In a person with diabetes, however, the entry of glucose is impaired, either because of deficiency in the amount of insulin produced or of a blocking of the action of the insulin. Consequently, sugar builds up in the blood and is discharged in the urine. In a Type I diabetic, the problem is almost always a severe or total reduction in insulin production.

Biography:

Takashi Shiroko graduated from Gifu University School of Medicine Japan in 1985 and got PhD in 1995. He researched about cancer immunological system in Roswell Cancer Institute, Buffalo NY in 1996-97. He is a chief of Emergency Medical Center and the assistant Director of Takayama Red Cross Hospital. He did war surgery as a surgeon in Sudan (2002), Afghanistan (2004), Pakistan (2005) and Uganda (2010-11) as a member of ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva). In Japan, he did medical relief in Kobe (1995) and Tohoku (2011) earthquake.

Abstract:

Japan has 108 active volcanos which are about 7% of the one in the world. Mt. Ontake(3067m) is located 30km from Takayama, at the center of Japan, erupted without a precursor at 11:52 am on September 27, 2014. Many climbers on the summit were involved in the eruption, and 63 people were dead or missing. Early the next morning, a Disaster Medical Assistance Team from our hospital and Mountain Rescue Team carried out rescue and first aid operations for a group of 26 climbers who had been evacuated to a cabin located on the highest summit in Gifu Prefecture. Of the climbers, 3 who required medical treatment were transported by helicopter to our hospital. Case 1: A 39-year-old female had open fractures of the left clavicle, scapula, and ribs and underwent debridement under general anesthesia. Case 2: A 52-year-old male had an open fracture of the left humerus and underwent irrigation and fixation. Case 3: A 46-year-old male had serious bruising and swelling on the left side of his body due to extensive contusions with high serum levels of creatine kinase. All the patients had blunt injuries and penetrating injuries that were classified as secondary or quaternary blast injuries caused by the impact of high-velocity fragments of volcanic rock, debris and gas.

Although it is difficult to predict a volcanic eruption, it may be possible to reduce disasters by installing shelters and wearing protective clothing.

Biography:

Junko Shiroko has Graduated from Gifu University School of Medicine in Japan in 1984 and got PhD in 1994. She has researched for cancer immunological system in Roswell Cancer Park Institute, Buffalo NY in 1996-97. She is a Gastroenterologist and a Chief of Internal Medical Department of Takayama Red Cross Hospital. She has worked as a Physician in Cambodia (1995), Sumatra Tsunami disaster relief (2005), Pakistan earthquake (2005), Zimbabwe cholera outbreak (2008) Haiti earthquake (2010) as a Member of Red Cross.

Abstract:

Due to a mass population movement from Syria and Iraq to Greece and the closure of Balkan route February 2016, almost 57,000 are stranded in Greece. The Finland and German Red Cross Society jointly started Basic Health Care Emergency Response Unit for providing medical assistance to immigrants and refugees. The team was consisted of doctors, nurses, midwives, mental care personnel, interpreters and technicians from various countries. And each member of the medical staff of 20 persons served for 4 weeks to be succeeded by a new member. I participated in this mission as a physician and we treated 50~70 patients/day at the general outpatient tents in three refugee camps each, with interpreters who speak Arabic or Kurdish. Since more than 40% of residents are children, we had many upper respiratory tract infections. Unlike natural disasters, as people lived in a camp longer, we were forced to respond to chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart diseases. There were cases of region-specific diseases such as Familial Mediterranean fever or Leishmaniasis. Some special drugs needed were not available at the basic healthcare level. There were relatively many cases of patients whose symptoms were thought to have been caused by mental stress. We sometimes sent patients to a Greek hospital who needed close examination and treatment. While the future is still unpredictable for refugees, I hope things may turn for the better to any extent.